affection


This poor disillusioned monkey owner is going to jail for his pet marmoset. Is this heroic or part of the monkeys menace plan to place as many people in prison, out of the way, for their attack? You decide. From CityNews:

Never get in the way of a man and his monkey. That seems to be the lesson one man was trying to teach the justice system in the U.S.

But despite his best efforts, it didn’t quite work.

When David Grigorian, a 43-year-old resident from Van Nuys, California, got a marmoset monkey as a pet a few years back, he quickly fell in love with the creature. But he didn’t have a permit for the exotic animal and a court ordered him to get rid of it.

The controversy began last January when cops investigated Grigorian on an unrelated matter. After arriving at his home, they found the animal but not the permits he needed to keep it. He was ordered to get rid of it and promised he would.

A face only a punkey could love!
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Somehow, Punkeys have managed to generate a lot of pro-ape PR from the science community. These evil simians are manipulating the system to gain our trust. And as soon as they do…WATCH OUT!

From The Telegraph:

Animals can be altruistic, according to a study that has found monkeys enjoy giving.

The researchers discovered that capuchin monkeys – like humans – find generosity a satisfying experience. They offered the monkeys a choice of selfishly rewarding themselves with food, or giving some to another capuchin as well.

When paired with a monkey they knew, the capuchins were more likely to choose the “pro-social” sharing option, but were more selfish when paired with a stranger.

The researchers believe the pleasure of seeing a fellow creature happy is behind the drive for sharing, which is common to primate species.

Frans de Waal of the Yerkes National Primate Research Centre at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, said: “The fact the capuchins predominantly selected the pro-social option must mean seeing another monkey receive food is satisfying or rewarding for them.

“We believe pro-social behavior is empathy-based. Empathy increases in both humans and animals with social closeness, and in our study, closer partners made more pro-social choices. They seem to care for the welfare of those they know.”

It follows a recent study that showed increased activity in reward centers of the brain after humans gave to charity. (more…)

Wow. The punkey propaganda machine is revving on all cylinders with this news from Science Daily:

Compared to their sex-mad, peace-loving bonobo counterparts, chimpanzees are often seen as a scheming, war-mongering, and selfish species. (They are!!) As both apes are allegedly our closest relatives, together they are often depicted as representing the two extremes of human behaviour.

Orlaith Fraser, who will receive her PhD from LJMU’s School of Biological Sciences in July 2008, has conducted research that shows chimpanzee behavior is not as clear cut as previously thought. Her study is the first one to demonstrate the effects of consolation amongst chimpanzees.

In her recently published article, Fraser analyses how the apes behave after a fight. Working with Dr Daniel Stahl of Kings College London and Filippo Aureli, LJMU’s Professor of Animal Behaviour, she found that third-party chimpanzees will try to console the ‘victim’ of the fight by grooming, hugging and kissing.

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